Aristotles views on friendship

Aristotle and his view of Friendship Aristotle wrote on a vast amount of subjects during his lifetime, such as biology, chemistry, physics, ethics and logic. In one of his most popular works, Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle discusses a variety of these subjects in order to find virtue and moral character.

Aristotles views on friendship

Aristotle felt that friendship was so important that he devoted an entire section of the Nicomachean Ethics to it. Happiness as a motive for friendship, the three levels of friendship, and salvaging friendships at all costs are a few philosophies that Aristotle holds.

Aristotle is adamant on the idea that friendship is absolutely necessary to our lives and that we cannot be truly happy without it. No matter how many material objects a person has, none of them will bring the sense of virtue, good and happiness that friendship does. Even when it comes to the idea of government and the bond of the people within a state, friendship seems to be the base, the glue that holds everything and everyone together.

While it is often said that opposites attract, Aristotle strongly believes in a differing point of view that birds of a feather flock together.

Aristotle - Wikipedia

He strongly feels, as do I, that people with similarities and a common ground are able to get along better and connect better with one of their kind, rather than a complete opposite. Aristotle found that several people believed that there is only one kind of friendship.

As a philosopher, though, he went on to explain that there is a possibility to have three different kinds of friendship, or three levels of friendship. It is necessary for there to be some sort of bond or connection in order for a friendship to develop, especially to a level three virtuous friendship.

Aristotle - Wikipedia

However, this idea is even true in level one and two, utility and pleasure friendships. The most insignificant, and short-lived level of friendship is a friendship based solely on utility, basically a friendship based on convenience. These friendships are self-centered friendships that only exist for the good of one party.

Examples of utility friendships are business partners, carpooling, or study groups. I personally know that these kinds of friendships exist, whether I would like to admit it or not. How many of us would stop being friends with the kid down the hall if he was not the smart kid who could help you with homework?

The next level of friendship is the friendship based solely on pleasure. These are, incidentally, friendships that last a little longer than utility friendships but are still not everlasting. In these friendships, the person is accepted and admired for the pleasure the person brings, whether it be laughter or satisfaction.

Once the pleasure has exhausted itself, there is no longer a need for the friendship, and the people usually lose contact with one another. Casual sexual relationships or relationships with people for purely their sense of humor or some other trait are examples of pleasurable friendships.

These friendships, once again, satisfy the needs of a person. The most sacred, precious, and rare friendship is the level three friendship. A friendship based on virtue is one that comes few and far between, and a person is lucky to be able to have even one of these friendships in his or her life.

The next level of friendship is the friendship based solely on pleasure. These are, incidentally, friendships that last a little longer than utility friendships but are still not everlasting/5(1). Introduction to Politics. Politics is derived from the Greek words 'Polis' which means community and 'Poli' meaning many. Politics can be defined as the laws, methods and practices of group which makes decisions (i.e. a government over a community). Friendship is clearly necessary and splendid, but people disagree on its precise nature. Friendship consists of a mutual feeling of goodwill between two people. There are three kinds of friendship. The first is friendship based on utility, where both people derive some benefit from each other. The.

In a virtuous friendship, the well being of the other party is the main focus; basically, it is allocentric, centered on the other person, as opposed to egocentric, self-centered.

People of this nature are rare, making it more difficult to develop a level one or two friendship into a level three friendship. In addition, people are not willing to spend the time or put forth the effort to make such strong bonds with others.

Virtuous friendships are considered to be the perfect friendships that are long lasting, because they unite the two beings. In the case of utility and pleasure friendships, once the utility and pleasure run out, the love runs out, leading to the end of theAristotle's View on Friendship This Essay Aristotle's View on Friendship and other 64,+ term papers, college essay examples and free essays are available now on alphabetnyc.com Autor: review • January 5, • Essay • 1, Words (6 Pages) • 1, Views4/4(1).

Aristotle (b. – d. BCE), was a Greek philosopher, logician, and scientist.

Aristotle’s Early Life

Along with his teacher Plato, Aristotle is generally regarded as one of the most influential ancient thinkers in a number of philosophical fields, including political theory. Introduction to Politics.

Politics is derived from the Greek words 'Polis' which means community and 'Poli' meaning many. Politics can be defined as the laws, methods and practices of group which makes decisions (i.e.

a government over a community). Dec 14,  · [5] Therefore, Aristotle views both friendship of utility and pleasure as unstable and constantly subject to abrupt change, which in fact dissolves the friendship, however; Aristotle moves on and begins discussing the truest form of friendship: that of alphabetnyc.com: Ty.

Aristotles views on friendship

The fact that Aristotle was a pupil of Plato contributed to his former views of Platonism, but, following Plato's death, Aristotle immersed himself in empirical studies and shifted from Platonism to empiricism. He believed all concepts and knowledge were ultimately based on perception.

Friendship in Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics, Books 8 & 9. Friendshipis a virtue and is besides most necessary with a view to living.

Without friends no one would choose to .

Aristotle’s View on Friendship - Essay - Fonta